1. I found the following error from gpgv to be a little opaque: gpgv: unknown type of key resource 'trustedkeys.kbx' gpgv: keyblock resource '/home/lars/.gnupg/trustedkeys.kbx': General error gpgv: Can't check signature: No public key It turns out that’s gpg-speak for “your trustedkeys.kbx keyring doesn’t exist”. That took longer to figure out than I care to admit. To get a key from your regular public keyring into your trusted keyring, you can run something like the following:

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  2. Out of the box, OpenShift (4.x) on bare metal doesn’t come with any integrated load balancer support (when installed in a cloud environment, OpenShift typically makes use of the load balancing features available from the cloud provider). Fortunately, there are third party solutions available that are designed to work in bare metal environments. MetalLB is a popular choice, but requires some minor fiddling to get it to run properly on OpenShift.

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  3. I’ve had my eye on the Vortex Core keyboard for a few months now, and this past week I finally broke down and bought one (with Cherry MX Brown switches). The Vortex Core is a 40% keyboard, which means it consists primarily of letter keys, a few lonely bits of punctuation, and several modifier keys to activate different layers on the keyboard. Physical impressions It’s a really cute keyboard.

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  4. At work we have a cluster of IBM Power 9 systems running OpenShift. The problem with this environment is that nobody runs Power 9 on their desktop, and Docker Hub only offers automatic build support for the x86 architecture. This means there’s no convenient options for building Power 9 Docker images…or so I thought. It turns out that Docker provides GitHub actions that make the process of producing multi-architecture images quite simple.

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  5. This is part of a series of posts about my experience working with OpenShift and CNV. In this post, I’ll look at how the recently released CNV 2.4 resolves some issues in managing virtual machines that are attached directly to local layer 2 networks In an earlier post, I discussed some issues around the management of virtual machine MAC addresses in CNV 2.3: in particular, that virtual machines are assigned a random MAC address not just at creation time but every time they boot.

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  6. This is the second in a series of posts about my experience working with OpenShift and CNV. In this post, I’ll be taking a look at how to expose services on a virtual machine once you’ve git it up and running. TL;DR Overview Connectivity options Direct attachment Using an OpenShift Service Exposing services on NodePorts Exposing services on cluster external IPso Exposing services using a LoadBalancer TL;DR Networking seems to be a weak area for CNV right now.

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  7. This is the first in a series of posts about my experience working with OpenShift and CNV (“Container Native Virtualization”, a technology that allows you to use OpenShift to manage virtualized workloads in addition to the containerized workloads for which OpenShift is known). In this post, I’ll be taking a look at the installation experience, and in particular at how restrictions in our local environment interacted with the network requirements of the installer.

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  8. [This is a guest post by my partner Alexandra van Geel.] TL;DR Hello everyone! The Basics: Masks vs. Respirators Question: What makes a good mask? Commercially available options The O2 Canada Curve Respirator The Vogmask valveless mask Some tips about comfort References Disclaimer: I am not an expert, just a private individual summarizing available information. Please correct me if I’ve gotten something wrong. TL;DR I suggest: (a) the Vogmask valveless mask or (b) the O2 Canada Curve Respirator.

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  9. The folks at Seeed Studio were kind enough to send me a Grove Beginner Kit for Arduino for review. That’s a mouthful of a name for a compact little kit! The Grove Beginner Kit for Arduino (henceforth “the Kit”, because ain’t nobody got time to type that out more than a few times in a single article) is about 8.5 x 5 x 1 inches. Closed, you could fit two of them on a piece of 8.

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  10. The folks at Seeed Studio have just released the Grove Beginner Kit for Arduino, and they asked if I would be willing to take a look at it in exchange for a free kit. At first glance it reminds me of the Radio Shack (remember when they were cool?) electronics kit I had when I was a kid – but somewhat more advanced. I’m excited to take a closer look, but given shipping these days means it’s probably a month away at least.

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